Remove stubborn lipstick with this one (cheap) miracle product

I don’t know about you, but I am having a real love affair with liquid lipsticks at the moment – the best ones stay all day, don’t transfer, and survive the messiest of foods. Yeah, I’m looking at you, tacos. I have a few liquid lipsticks in bold colours because I live in the school of thought that says GO BIG, OR GO HOME. (I spend a lot of time at home these days, so maybe I need a better phrase.)

I have one issue with these beautiful matte colours though. (Well, besides the fact that they are DRYING AF and if I forget to scrub my poor lips, they go all dry and awful). And this issue is this – after a long day of lots of delicious foods, I thoroughly wash my face…and the lipstick is still there. Wash again. Still there. I then panic and/or go to bed with my lipstick on. At least I’ll wake up looking gorgeous.

I know what you’re thinking. But, Caz – why don’t you just use makeup remover like everyone else? Well, I do. And I tell you what, I have sensitive skin, and my lovely gentle L’Oreal and Soap and Glory makeup removers have a good try but they still can’t get it all off. Waterproof mascara? No problem. Lipstick? Hahaha…no.

Slight tangent. You know when you buy a notebook or something, and it has a barcode sticker on it? Or you buy a gift for a mate and you got it at 20% off because the stars were aligned or something, and then you go home to get that damn sticker off and it half rips off but leaves a sticky papery residue? You know those stickers? The ones that were invented to make you cry? Yeah. Well, I had a bit of a Sticker Situation a few months ago and after consulting Doctor Google – it turns out that you can remove sticky residue with oil. OIL. All this time i’ve been scrubbing away with soap and water  (or even vinegar and bicarbonate of soda because someone on the internet said it worked, but I guess this is the same person who said that you can clean forks more quickly if you microwave them. YOU CAN’T, PLEASE DON’T DO THAT.) and it turns out that the best way to get rid of stickers is oil. I know, whaaattt?

So I got thinking. What if it was the same for lipsticks? I mean, they get kind of tacky and sticky when you’ve tried to wash them off but they’re still being a stubborn little shit about it. What if they’re the face’s version of a Sticker Situation? So I got thinking more.

Now, I didn’t want to use my indulgently expensive Kiehl’s face oil to try this out, so maybe that would work even better. But I did nip to the shops and I picked up some baby oil. And I’ll just cut to the chase – IT WORKS. It actually works!

Sorry-not-sorry for all the lips you’re about to see. Maybe you like that kind of thing, in which case, you’re welcome.

Here is Mac’s retro matte liquid lipstick in ‘Carnivorous’, which I absolutely love. I have applied it fairly haphazardly so I’m sorry about that.

Carnivorous liquid lipstick by Mac
And here is what it looks like after I’ve wash my face twice. Yes, twice.

patchy half removed lipstick

Ugh. And here is what it looks like after I’ve reapplied it fully, waited ten minutes for it to dry, then firmly swiped some baby oil all over my lips to remove it.

lipstick removed

Not a trace left behind! It is actual magic. Here’s what I do.

I grab a little cotton face pad or cotton ball, douse it in baby oil, and firmly swipe towards my inner mouth (to reduce smearing colour all over my cheeks/chin) – and the lipstick just comes right off! And the biggest bonus of it all is that baby oil is super, super cheap. Much cheaper than my makeup remover which I can save for the eyes (which I guess you probably don’t want to get baby oil in – so I don’t recommend for removing eyeliner or mascara, I’m not a sadist.)

Swipe, swipe. Oh look, half gone already!

swiping off the lipstick half removed lipstick

My recommendation is to swipe it off before removing the rest of your makeup and continuing with your normal skincare routine, as sometimes the colour smudges as you take it off, and you really could do with washing off all that oil with a cleanser.

So, that’s my miracle product! Baby oil. It is just the best. And, top tip, you can use it to remove those stubborn stickers with it too!

Do you have any makeup removal hacks? Or do you use baby oil?

My First…holiday abroad

HOLIDAY ABROAD

My first holiday abroad was in 1997, when my family went to Ibiza for a week. I remember being so excited about it, rushing around imagining what it was going to be like on a plane, what the food was going to be like, whether there would be a beach or a pool. I packed carefully, over the space of about three months, conducting a little social experiment with my toys to check which ones were suitable to remove from the group for a week and to weed out those who might not deal well with the aeroplane. My brother had this fantastic book which had drawings of all sorts of vehicles that had been visually chopped in half so you could peep into all the rooms. It was meticulously labelled, and I pored for hours over the image of a military aeroplane so I knew exactly what to expect from our flight.

It’s amazing how much detail you remember as a child. I can remember the name of the person who took care of our table at the hotel restaurant – Raquel, her name was. She had a kind face and bright auburn hair, and teased us over our Spanish pronunciation. The hotel felt like a 5 star mansion to me, and I explored it as if I were its king. The restaurant was tired and clearly hadn’t been updated since the 80s, the ornate coving around the top of the room had paint peeling off it. But to me, it was a fancy palace. It was so fancy that they had wall-to-wall buffets where you could choose to eat whatever you wanted. I could eat chips for dessert? I didn’t have to eat mushrooms? I was giddy with all that power.

I feel like that was my first true taste of what it is to be able to choose, a privilege that middle-class westerners like myself are very much spoilt for. It’s a bit sad that I can remember this being a novelty. Now it’s just life, I guess.

I got carted off to some kind of activity camp for children for a number of days a week. Actually, now I think about it, I can’t remember whether I was forced to or whether I chose to. Thinking about it, I imagine I probably wanted to – I liked meeting new people. We did arts and crafts all day, and there were water fights and origami planes, and these wire bound notebooks with a very special pen that we could write in over the course of the week. There were tasks and activities in the books that we could do when we were back with our families, and we could note them down and win awards. At the end of the week there was a prize-giving ceremony, and the kids that received the awards had these weird cardboard cutouts of armless people that I now realise were supposed to look like Oscars, but at the time I had no idea what that was, of course.

The holiday wasn’t just my first trip abroad. This was the holiday where I first learned to dive, something I was both petrified and excited about. I was awful at it. Belly-flop after belly-flop I went down, red marks stretching across my tummy and my goggles dislodged. Chlorine in one eye. A tear of frustration quickly wiped away.

But I practised. Diligently, every single day, I insisted that we go to the pool. I marched us to the deep end, and I asked for help. And over and over and over again I threw myself into the water until finally – I did it. I remember that feeling of my arms outstretched, the water coming towards me and my dumpy little legs held as straight as I possibly could. And then that feeling of euphoria as I find myself suddenly able to glide down into the water with no resistance, the water pushing on my body and that second that I crash to the surface, momentarily so blinded by excitement that I forget to breathe.

I did it. But, I wasn’t done. With a determination that I wish I had even half of as an adult, I got straight back up and did it again. And again. And again. Until I could do it perfectly.

On the last day of our holiday, I was so nervous I would forget all about everything that I needed to buy a momento I could keep forever. I used all my pocket money on a terracotta figure in the tourist shop, a dancing woman with a determined grin and the fanciest ra-ra skirt. Black and white polka dot. And although I think she disappeared in about 2002 when my parents moved house, I can still remember her tiny painted face perfectly, forever engraved in my memory.