Review: Wearing the Wild West (Violets in May)

I honestly can’t believe it has taken me this long to buy myself a skirt from Violets in May. I first came across them a couple of years ago on Etsy, a shop full of beautiful, fun fabrics and a range of very fabulous 50s-style clothing. This was however before I fully embraced the novelty print – nowadays it’s difficult for me to avoid wearing something quirky and brightly coloured!

A couple of months ago, I was on the hunt for a decent quality gathered skirt. I’d been let down by a couple I’d purchased from some larger repro clothing stores, and couldn’t justify the shipping costs on top of the purchase price for some Vixen by Micheline Pitt and Pinup Girl Clothing pieces that have been on my lust list forever. I can find plenty of circle skirts, but for some reason a simple gathered skirt seems hard to come by! Until I remembered spotting a couple of Instagram pictures, around Hallowe’en time, of a gathered skirt with bats on. And then I stumbled back across Violets in May, and spent about an hour carefully favouriting almost every item on there – so many fantastic prints to choose from! A choice of a gathered skirt, a circle skirt, or a number of different tops and dresses! And best of all – a choice of a gathered skirt with, or without, pockets. SAY WHAT? POCKETS?? I AM SOLD.

The problem was, after having favourited almost everything, I then realised that my budget wouldn’t stretch to 30 skirts. I had to choose one. Now, I’m not normally a huge fan of bubble-gum pink and my wardrobe has lots of black, red, green and blue in it. I tend to stay away from anything too bright and whilst I have no issue with wearing pink, I am just never drawn to it.

Until I saw this jaw-droppingly unique fabric. I was pretty much sold when I spotted it had cacti on it, but the playful collection of colours and cowgirl pinups was just so strangely alluring, I just had to make it mine.

Violets in May skirt close up

I’ve put on a little bit of weight over the past few months and my waist is a bit bigger now – it is between 28.5″ and 29″ at the moment. The size guide says 28 inches is a size 10 and 30 inches is a size 12. I went for a size 12, thinking i can bring it in with a belt if need be.

Violets in May appears to be a one-woman operation, and so once my order went in, there was a 4-6 week wait for it to be hand-stitched before shipping. Four weeks after putting in my order, it arrived – and (spoiler alert) it is absolutely bloody incredible.

Violets in May skirt, side on view

It arrived beautifully packaged. The material has no stretch to it, but the cotton feels high-quality. I opted for a version without pockets (I know! What was I thinking?!) because I’ve been let down before buying gathered skirts with pockets where the material seems to sit on top of my hips making them look bigger. As my hips is an area I’m quite self-conscious about, I thought I’d try no pockets. I also had no idea what to expect from Violets in May so thought I’d try the very basic gathered skirt to see how I found it. Considering the fit and quality, I am furious at Past Caz for not having the decency to pay extra for pockets as they would have made this skirt a 10/10 for me.

My favourite feature about this skirt is actually the zip at the back. The whole item feels very well-made, and zips always make me feel more secure. I’ve had buttons loosen on me before, so I always prefer to be able to zip myself in.

The sizing is spot on. It’s 26″ in length, which is knee-length on me, at 5’8″. I measured the waist at 29.9 inches, and whilst it’s slightly on the bigger side, I actually prefer a slightly looser fit in gathered skirts as I feel that they sit better, especially with a fluffy petticoat. I am wearing a white Malco Modes ‘Jennifer’ petticoat underneath, which is a medium-full petticoat, and it fills it out perfectly. The skirt fabric isn’t super light either, so it also holds itself in more gusty conditions as well as holding the petticoat in place. Sometimes I find the petticoat can bunch between my legs if the skirt is less full (petticoat wearers, you get me?!) but I had no such problems wearing this outfit to Westfield and back again.

I’ve worn this skirt three times since it arrived, and every time I get a lot of compliments, and a lot of people asking where I got it. It’s probably the most comfortable (and most fun!) skirt that I own, and I can’t wait to buy another one/two/fifteen skirts from Violets in May.

And the best bit? For £60, these skirts are almost half the price of some of the bigger brands – and by buying one, you’re also supporting UK small businesses. What a win-win.

Top: H&M (old season)

Skirt: Violets in May

Petticoat: Malco Modes ‘Jennifer’

Shoes: George at Asda


BUY THIS:

>The ‘Howdy Cowgirl’ print is available in a gathered and tiered version from £60 (24″ length)


 

Weekly Newsletter – Issue 05


Issue 05 : 11 February 2018


Welcome to my weekly digest, covering things I’ve been reading, and interesting fact, my favourite posts on Instagram and a few things I’ve spotted that are on my shopping list. 

So January went quickly – or it went slowly, depending on who you ask. For me, it sauntered along at first, stumbled a little bit in the middle and tumbled unexpectedly right smack-bang into February.

I kind of feel sorry for Feb. It’s normally the month that brings yet another blanket of snow, and this time round we’re all a bit tired of it so it isn’t all excitement and sleds – instead, it’s trying to get to work only the trains are all broken and I fell over on the ice this morning and my bum hurts and my coffee went everywhere and can I please go back to bed now. Generally, it’s still cold and miserable enough for people to think that winter will never end. I’m actually trying to be optimistic – the shortest day of the year is behind us now and that means that it’s going to start getting lighter in the evenings. And every day that passes in February is a day closer to it being summer again.



 

You know Grandfather clocks? Those tall clocks that appear in plenty of period dramas, or perhaps stood in the corridor at your uncle’s house where it would deafen everyone on the hour with its obnoxious ringing? Those clocks? Well. It turns out that we’ve been calling them by the wrong name for all these years. They’re actually called long case clocks. (I know, I think that’s a much more boring name too.) Apparently they earned this adorable nickname thanks to a 1876 hit called ‘My Grandfather’s Clock‘ and the name just stuck.

 

More here : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longcase_clock

 


 

1. Deaths-Head Hawkmoth Necklace (SUGAR AND VICE)

This amazing acrylic statement necklace is from the talented Sarah and Matt who run Sugar and Vice Designs. I’m in love with the detail on this, and I can’t wait to make her mine! (£25)

> Available from Sugar and Vice’s website

 

2. Kingfisher Necklace (TATTY DEVINE)

You probably know by now how much a love my novelty items, and my acrylic jewellery – making the list is this colourful kingfisher necklace from Tatty Devine, which is on the pricier side – but you can’t go wrong with the quality and craftsmanship and TD are pretty much my go-to for statement items. I love the little things, like the mirrored feathers and the little fish. Absolutely beautiful. (£125)

> Find it here, at Tatty Devine’s online store

 

3. Hipster Chic ‘Hepburn’ Dress (LADY VINTAGE LONDON)

Every time Lady Vintage release a new collection, I feel like they’ve outdone themselves – and yet they continue to bring out increasingly diverse and fabulous dresses! I love all their latest items – but especially this hipster-themed one, which is hilarious yet still glamorous. I live in my Hepburn dresses, and own at least 12 of them. What harm would one more do, I moustache you? (£50)

>Available in sizes 8-28 from the Lady V site

 

4. Harlequin 50s Dress (HELL BUNNY)

I don’t know about you but the second I saw this dress, I knew immediately that it had to be mine. I literally ordered it that very minute – the pink and black harlequin design is such a stunning combination, and with the rose detailing? Beautiful. And I am a complete sucker for a gathered waist, such a rare treat in the repro vintage world! I hope I am united with this, the love of my life, before Valentine’s Day arrives. Hurry up DPD, I can’t wait this long!! (£46.99)

> Hell Bunny Harlequin 50’s dress is available in sizes XS-4XL

 

5. Orange Puffins ‘Audrina’ Dress (LINDY BOP)

Lindy Bop always do the most amazing prints, and whilst I find the quality of their clothing to vary wildly, I have to say that their recent collection has made me want to buy EVERYTHING. I don’t know if you can see, but this dress has the loveliest puffin print, and on such a vibrant peach background, it has me aching for long summer evenings and iced tea. 

The Audrina dress is a shorter ‘above knee’ version of the Audrey dress, which is another one of my favourites. A shorter length would be ideal for summer…if I can wait that long to buy it and wear it, that is. (£38)

> The Audrina dress is available in sizes 8 to 26 from the Lindy Bop website

 

 


Story Time : Calamari

One of the foods I miss the most is calamari.

My journey into the living hell of a gluten-free life started in 2012, and I’ve spent the past six years thinking about eight-legged sea creatures an unhealthy amount. I’ve never been the biggest seafood eater, and I mostly blame my parents for that. They are horrified at even the thought of eating something as small and adorable as baby prawns, and seem very happy on a diet of steak and chips. I’ve been a stubborn vegetarian since I was about five, so I guess my diet until I left home was basically chips. I had a hard life.

Calamari though. Crispy, and breaded, with a soft chewy middle. Like the savoury fishy equivalent of posh cookies.

I discovered calamari mostly by accident as a kid, when I was on holiday in Spain. I found these breaded things on the dinner buffet, labelled with a peculiar name I’d not seen before, and thought I’d try one, chancing that they were onion rings.

It’s probably worth mentioning at this point that I may have been a little mean about my parents’ diet. They don’t just eat steak and chips – sometimes they eat onion rings too. It isn’t unusual to go out to a restaurant and for my dad to order an enormous side portion of onion rings that he polishes off himself without offering to anyone else. My dad loves his onion rings.

Anyway, let’s go back to Spain (which is preferable to the cold winter evening I’m experiencing here in the UK right now) and imagine my childish curiosity when faced with this weird onion ring. Being an overly sensible child – or perhaps, less greedy than my parents – I get just one from the buffet. I sit down, and examine the onion ring. It looks delicious. I ditch the knife and fork and my manners and I pick it up with my fingers, and – as delicately as you can do as a seven-year old eating with their hands – I bite into it.

It is not what I am expecting, but actually, it isn’t bad. It’s a bit chewy, with a slightly strange taste I can’t really put my finger on, but it isn’t completely unpleasant. I have no idea what it is, but it seems nice. At this point, I look up to see that my dad is watching me. Well, correction, he’s watching the little breaded guy in my hand.

“You didn’t mention they had any of those.” The saliva is virtually dribbling down his chin. “What are they like?”

I look him in the eye. I am seven years old, but I am an awesome seven-year old. I smile. “Nice. A bit chewy,” I say to him, going in for a second bite.

He hasn’t even waited to hear past the word ‘nice’ – he is not a small person, and has to physically tug himself out of the chair to release himself from the table and he is basically running as fast as he can towards the trestle tables with the buffet. I watch him. He takes a small plate, and I count as he loads the calamari onto his plate. One. Two. Three. Ten. Fifteen. Eighteen.

“Ho, ho, ho,” he says gleefully as he arrives back at the table. Yes, I’m not kidding, he does genuinely say ‘ho ho ho’. He’s not emulating Father Christmas, I don’t think it’s a jolly “well, presents for aallll, ho ho!” kind of thing. He is just so pleased that he didn’t make the same mistake as me to just get one. No, he’s fooled the system. He has eighteen of the fuckers. He’s ho-ho-hoing in the ho-ho-hopes that he can eat them as quickly as possible and get another eighteen because he is possibly the world’s greediest person.

I watch as he takes a bite out of one of them. There is a small delay, before the horror reaches his face. He removes half the calamari from his mouth.

“What the-?!” he says, appalled. “It’s bloody squid!” My mum starts laughing. Then my sister, and my brother. Until we’re all laughing, and he’s sitting there sadly looking at his eighteen fake onion rings – not at all sad because it’s a waste that he’s just going to leave them, but sad because now he isn’t going to be able to eat eighteen onion rings in one sitting.

This isn’t the reason I miss calamari though. That was just the first time I remember eating it. And I have to admit it has left me with somewhat of a sweet spot for them.

No, the real reason I miss calamari is because they are breaded, so they’re cooked with wheat, and so far I haven’t found a gluten-free alternative. That means that it has been six years now where I haven’t been able to savour one of my favourite foods. What makes it worse, is that most of my favourite restaurants serves calamari as a starter, so I have this constant reminder every time I eat out that I can’t enjoy nice foods anymore.

So I guess this is really a plea to all the eight-legged friends out there – could you evade detection for the foreseeable future? If they can’t catch you, then they can’t cook you, and if they can’t cook you then they won’t cut off your delicious legs and cover you with gluteny breadcrumbs, and serve you on the menu in most restaurants I visit.